On Logic, Language and Numbers: Sanford Shieh Discusses Gottlob Frege's Enduring Mathematical Legacy

Q: The notion that certain mental structures are inborn and not derivable from our environments is one that goes back to the ancient Greeks, particularly Plato who first raised this question in his works Meno and Phaedo. Much later, 17th-century rationalists like René Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz further developed this area of inquiry. In fact, you have referred to your…

On Logic, Language and Numbers: Sanford Shieh Discusses Gottlob Frege's Enduring Mathematical Legacy

Q: You were recently awarded the 2013 Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences for your pioneering work in molecular evolutionary biology specifically for developing various statistical methods to determine the molecular mechanisms of biological diversity and evolution. Can you give us some insight on how you developed these methods and why you did it? A: When I was a college student…

On Logic, Language and Numbers: Sanford Shieh Discusses Gottlob Frege's Enduring Mathematical Legacy

Q: You’ve been writing about Charles Darwin and the development of Darwinism for many years, and you were the President of the British Society for the History of Science between 2004 and 2006. Could you explain what the term “Darwinism” really refers to? What is the difference between Darwinism and evolutionism? A: It’s easier to begin with “evolutionism,” which refers…

On Logic, Language and Numbers: Sanford Shieh Discusses Gottlob Frege's Enduring Mathematical Legacy

Q: A few years ago, you caused a stir in the pages of the London Review of Books with an article entitled “Why Pigs Don’t Have Wings” by attacking the concept of “natural selection” in evolutionary theory. Your article drew heavy criticism from many of your colleagues. What was the genesis of your doubts about Darwin’s theory? A: I’ve had…

On Logic, Language and Numbers: Sanford Shieh Discusses Gottlob Frege's Enduring Mathematical Legacy

Q: Mr. Darwin, you lived in Victorian times when the prevailing mores were very strict. The first reaction to the publication of The Origin of Species was critical. Were you surprised? A: Not at all. I expected the criticism from the non-scientific community and the initial responses were indeed quite harsh, such as a demand that I should be tried…

On Logic, Language and Numbers: Sanford Shieh Discusses Gottlob Frege's Enduring Mathematical Legacy

Q: How did Darwin first come to accept evolution and which kinds of evidence most influenced his views? A: He accepted evolution about March 1837. Clearly a number of things were important, but the geographical distributions of the organisms he had seen in the Galapagos were very important. Empirical evidence was not the only thing, however. By this time he…

Authoritative Info About Famous Historical Figures | Simplycharly